Nigeria's mix of cultures and people, its multiple languages and many different traditions, is both the delight and the bane of traveling in this country. The multitude of customs and cultures make traveling in Nigeria an interesting expedition into African life, but also keeps this country divided against itself and makes it difficult to unite support for the region.

At the moment, workers and travelers are targeted in certain regions that tourists should avoid like the Niger Delta. This unfortunate travel advisory and the tensions it causes isn't likely to end until foreign oil companies stop leaching away Nigeria's biggest natural resource and reaping the benefits overseas.

What to do

Other than the culture and the people, Nigeria's national parks are its biggest tourist draw. Kainji National Park and Yankari National Park are two remnants of the wildlife that once dominated Nigeria. Yankari Park is Nigeria's most popular tourism attractions and perhaps the most popular eco-tourism destination in West Africa.

Wikki Springs, near the park's most populated camp, is a warm spring open for swimming by the local tourists. There are daily safaris and tours from Wikki Camp and educational exhibits throughout the camp.

Getting there

There are flights from London, Amsterdam, Beirut, Paris, and Atlanta to various airports around Nigeria.

Unlike many of the other West African countries, getting a visa to Nigeria can be difficult. Travel to Nigeria should therefore be planned well in advance.

Where to stay

There are five star hotels in Abuja, Port Harcourt and Lagos for the steady stream of international clients that the foreign investments in Nigeria bring to the country. Five star hotels aren't up to the international standards that western nations enjoy, but they're the best you're going to get.

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