7 must see places when visiting Bournemouth

Each year Bournemouth welcomes hundreds of thousands of visitors from around the world. People come to Bournemouth for numerous reasons; to view the world record firework displays, to attend a show at the Bournemouth International Centre or to relax on the eight miles of golden beach – weather permitting of course. The Hermitage is one of the best hotels in Bournemouth and is located just next to the famous beach and has put together a comprehensive list of sites to see when coming to Bournemouth.

1. Bournemouth Gardens

Bournemouths glorious Gardens consist of the Upper, Central and Lower Gardens, which run from the seafront to the town centre. They have won three Britain in Bloom Awards and they have also received several Green Flag Awards. While walking around the gardens, you will also have the opportunity to test yourself on the ever popular crazy golf course and take a trip high in the sky on the Bournemouth balloon.

Image credit – World Heritage Coast

2. Bournemouth Oceanarium

Bournemouth’s Oceanarium is home to approximately 2000 fish. The Amazon, the Mediterranean Sea, the Ganges and Africa are only a few of the many themed displays in the aquarium. And, there are a lot of other things you can explore during your visit, such as the Marine Research Lab, the Interactive Dive Cage, or the Global Meltdown Experience.

3. Bournemouth Pier

From Bournemouth Pier, you have a fabulous view of the Bay and the adorable coastline. It also provides souvenir shops, a theatre and a bar and restaurant. The main pier is visible from points along the beach but if you walk East from the Hermitage, you’ll eventually get to the smaller Boscombe pier. Each year Charity walks and swims take place between these two piers in aid of charity, bringing many more thousands people into the area.

Bournemouth Pier

Image credit – BBC Dorset

4. Corfe Castle

The ruined castle dates back to the 11th century and has a connection to William the Conqueror. It was a royal stronghold for over 500 years, but, unfortunately, it was destroyed during the civil war by the Parliamentarians. For visitors, the ruins offer an impressive picture of the countryside and Purbeck Coast.

5. Old Harry Rocks

Old Harry Rocks, which are part of the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site, are chalk stacks and located between Studland and Swanage. One legend says, that the rocks were named after Poole’s pirate, Harry Paye, who kept his contraband close-by. Few people who live in Bournemouth have visited Old Harry Rocks, so when visiting, make sure you don’t miss out!

Old Harry Rocks in Dorset

image credit – Information Britain

6. Durdle Door

This rock formation, which is situated 0.6 miles westerly from Lulworth Cove, is the most famous and most photographed attraction along the Jurassic Coast. Getting to Durdle Door from the Hermitage Hotel in central Bournemouth will take you around 45 minutes but will allow you to see some of the most breath taking coastline in Dorset as well as seeing one of the most memorable naturally occuring sites in the UK.

7. Sandbanks

Sandbanks is the fourth most expensive place to live in the world and by many described as Britain’s Monte Carlo. Its main attraction is the beautiful beach, which is known as one of the best in the UK. Sandbanks is home to some of the most wealthy and famous people from all walks of life. Many millionaire business owners live in the area as well as celebrities from sport, film and television. Sandbanks can be reached by car within 30 minutes from of Bournemouth and offers visitors a chance to visit one of the most exclusive areas in the UK, if not the world.

Sandbanks bay from the air

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Image credit – Guardian.co.uk

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  • Tom Faull said at 2011-08-24T14:57:45+0000: You can also find out more about Bournemouth on http://www.visitbournemouth.com including free attractions.