Community Content Travel Articles

 
Strange Cures
Today for the 2015 Indie Travel Challenge we asked you: One of the ways we gave you to answer is to talk about strange cures you’ve learned while traveling.  Strange doesn’t mean bad or ineffective, some of these cures you may have not heard before but may work wonders.  When you are traveling, don’t doubt the local medicine.  At the very least you’ll get some good stories from it. Here are some ‘strange cures’ sent to us by some fellow travelers:   “My wife Larissa and I were snorkeling in the US Virgin Islands when I was bitten by a jelly fish. It was pretty painful in my side to the point it was hard to move. I stumbled back to our rental apartment when the caretaker there approached me yielding a large machete saying in his island patois, ‘I can fix that.” I flinched because I thought he was about to lance it or cut it out when he swung the machete down on an aloe plant that was next to me. He hacked the aloe leaf into pieces and told me to roast them in the oven and then apply them to the swollen area where I had been bitten. I did so and it worked. According to him the aloe sucks the venom from the body. I have no […]
What is something you’ve learned from traveling?
Today for the 2015 Indie Travel Challenge we asked a bunch of seasoned travelers to tell us 1 thing they have learned from traveling.   From silly to serious here is what fellow travelers have learned from traveling:     “I learned the hard way that, if you are prone to getting carsick yet sometimes travel via chicken bus, sit in the front.” – Jen Miner, The Vacation Gals “Skip your Lonely Planet—talk to bartenders and taxi drivers. Your guidebooks don’t know the best places to go. Bartenders and taxi drivers have their ear to the ground and always know what’s happening around town. Talk to them about where to go or what to see, and you can trust that you’re being given good advice.”   – Jeremy Scott Foster, travelFREAK “Travel has thought me that people are much quicker to open up to you if you show that you’re open to connecting with them. Just smiling at someone can ignite a conversation or turn the most grumpy salesman in a friendly chap.” – Sofie Couwenbergh,  Wonderful Wanderings  “I’ve learned that the level of customer service varies from country to country and city to city. What one is accustomed to back home can be very different (both good and bad) from what you experience when travelling so you just have to […]
How Can You be a Responsible Traveler?
Today we are super-excited to have Diana Edelman, author of DTravelsRound, co-founder of the Responsible Tourism and Travel Collective (RTTC), former full-time volunteer at the Save Elephant Foundation in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and all around ecotravel and responsible tourism expert guest post today on the Indie Travel Challenge.  Diana gives us her advice on:   “After working in the responsible tourism industry for a few years, I am always conscious of my travels and how they are — or could be — more responsible. I’ve seen the first-hand effects of what traveling irresponsibly does to animals, as well as cultures, and know how imperative it is that myself, and others, try to become more responsible in our adventures. Ecotourism is a vague term that encompasses a lot. By definition, it involves traveling to areas which are natural and minimizing the impact of those who visit. It affords travelers an opportunity to see nature, wildlife and more without causing harm. It is absolutely important to me. As places around the world become desecrated because of people visiting, species become extinct and importance is placed on “see it before it’s gone” is the new buzz term, it is incredibly important to me that preservation efforts are made. There are many ways people can travel more responsibly. Little things like shopping and eating locally, staying […]
Giving Back to the Local Economy on Your RTW Trip
Today on the Indie Travel Challenge we asked you:   Cristina loves buying local and tells us about how she helps give back when she travels: “Over the years, I’ve got into the habit of visiting my local farmers’ market every chance I got. I may go as often as 3 times a week during the summer season. And with the increase in hand-made businesses and fairs, they also become part of my life where I live.     When I travel, I choose to give back by: staying in locally owned guesthouses or hostels buying food from the farmers’ markets visiting artisan fairs, including Christmas Markets The only thing I find to be challenging in the non-English speaking countries is the language barrier. The local businesses aren’t created for tourists so if you are not fluent in the native language, it may get a bit awkward. For the past 4 years, I’ve been visiting the Christmas Markets in Budapest every winter (or shall I say every December around my birthday?). Every single time I come back with: hand-made soap, hand-made something-to-wear or hand-made Christmas decorations. And every single time my husband does the talking because I speak a limited number of words in Hungarian. For our wedding anniversary this year, we chose Eger, the city well known for its […]
This Week on BootsnAll: Solo Travel, Safety & New Zealand
Do you travel solo? Do you worry about safety when you travel, especially as a woman? Have you been to New Zealand? Ever considered touring the country’s beautiful islands, mountains and lakes by camper van? Yes? This is your week on BootsnAll! We’ve got articles you don’t want to miss: Solo Travel for Non-Solo Travelers Jenn Sutherland-Miller has been traveling full time for seven years with her family (she has four kids!) She is also a big supporter of the idea of solo travel. Perhaps you think you could never travel solo, because you’ve got a partner, kids, or fears that hold you back. She argues that those are the very reasons you MUST travel by yourself. “Traveling solo allows me to nurture the most important relationship I have: the one with myself. In our world of constant busy-ness and overwhelming responsibilities, it becomes very easy, as it all piles up, to forget who we are, that we matter, and that if we don’t nurture that inner source, we will quickly find the well that we draw from to give to the world has gone dry.” Read Solo Travel for Non-Solo Travelers. You need this one. 7 Stunning Lakes of the South Island, New Zealand This one is pure eye candy and wilderness porn. If you’ve been to New Zealand, […]
A Global Family Tree (and the French Version of Me) | 30 Days of Indie Travel Project #indie30
A Global Family Tree (and the French Version of Me) | 30 Days of Indie Travel Project #indie30 This is part of BootsnAll’s 30 Days of Indie Travel project, a daily blogging challenge with a prompt for every day in November 2011. Check out the prompt at the bottom of this post to find out how you can participate! My father was born in Germany in 1935, Jewish in an inhospitable time and place, and he spent the first five years of his life moving almost constantly westward. From Germany into France, where he spoke his first words and nearly died from malnutrition, then into Spain with the help of Basque people who shepherded his parents over the mountains, and finally onto a ship bound for America. At the age of five-and-a-half, he first saw the lights of New York City cut through the dark of a winter night as the ship neared the port, and he cried, “C’est le paradis!” This journey was not an easy or pleasant one, and until the day he died at 71, my father didn’t talk about it much. What the diaspora of his extended family gave me as a youngster, however, was something positive and tangible that I wouldn’t truly understand until many years later. As a very young child, I knew of cousins in Paris and in Tel Aviv, and of an aunt – my father’s younger sister – in […]
A Love Affair with Possibility | 30 Days of Indie Travel Project #indie30
A Love Affair with Possibility | 30 Days of Indie Travel Project #indie30 This is part of BootsnAll’s 30 Days of Indie Travel project, a daily blogging challenge with a prompt for every day in November 2011. Check out the prompt at the bottom of this post to find out how you can participate! I’m going to be perfectly blunt here – tackling the topic of a “special someone” or a “love affair” in a public forum when one is married is… Well, it’s not to be taken lightly, let’s just say that. Prior to meeting my husband, I wasn’t the person who had flings when I traveled, so there’s not even a story from the way-back machine I can call upon. Instead, then, I’m going to write about the very first thing that came to mind when I read today’s prompt. It’s not a person, or a particular instance, but a feeling I think we experience more often when we travel. It’s a feeling of possibility. Travel gives us the opportunity to live life differently than we do at home. It invites us to explore other customs, foreign cultures, and those roads we haven’t taken. I do this in a very mundane sense every time I look at a doorway, a window, or a path that leads out of sight. What’s on the other side of that door, or around that corner? […]
“Do you like bourbon?” (AKA How I Met the Sazerac) | 30 Days of Indie Travel Project #indie30
“Do you like bourbon?” (AKA How I Met the Sazerac) | 30 Days of Indie Travel Project #indie30 This is part of BootsnAll’s 30 Days of Indie Travel project, a daily blogging challenge with a prompt for every day in November 2011. Check out the prompt at the bottom of this post to find out how you can participate! My alcohol education began long after college, when my Parisian cousin threatened to disown me from the family for not being a wine drinker. It may go without saying, but I’ve come a long way since then – past dessert wine, cab-merlot blends, and syrupy cocktails, I now find myself a fan of things like gin and bourbon. I don’t often have more than one, especially when I’m traveling, but it’s fun to find unique drinks that give me a strong sense of place. When I was in New Orleans in early 2011, then, I was thrilled to be introduced to the cocktail long associated with the city: the Sazerac. I’d had my requisite pre-dinner cocktail at the famed Carousel Bar at the Hotel Monteleone – a much more delightful experience than I’d anticipated, given that it’s on so many must-do lists, and thankfully the bar turns slowly enough that having a gin & tonic without having eaten wasn’t an issue. It hadn’t occured to me to ask the bartender for his cocktail advice, which seems idiotic in retrospect. […]
A Stillness in the Air | 30 Days of Indie Travel Project #indie30
A Stillness in the Air | 30 Days of Indie Travel Project #indie30 This is part of BootsnAll’s 30 Days of Indie Travel project, a daily blogging challenge with a prompt for every day in November 2011. Check out the prompt at the bottom of this post to find out how you can participate! Nevermind that I don’t believe in God – I love visiting churches when I travel. In many places, they’re buildings full of as much history and art as religion, and I have immense respect for builders whose devotion to their version of the divine led to such masterpieces. It wasn’t in a church that I have felt the greatest sense of spirituality, however. It wasn’t even in a building. I was a mere passenger on that trip. It was my mother’s adventure, borne of a desire to go to the native ruins on the Haida Gwaii after seeing pictures in a book more than 25 years earlier, and I was just happy to have been invited. I knew little about our destination, other than the archipelago was off the northern coast of British Columbia and home to some very remote ancient village sites, and neglected to do much in the way of research before we left. But no amount of research could have prepared me for how the air would feel on the Haida Gwaii. There is a stillness […]
In So Many Words | 30 Days of Indie Travel Project #indie30
In So Many Words | 30 Days of Indie Travel Project #indie30 This is part of BootsnAll’s 30 Days of Indie Travel project, a daily blogging challenge with a prompt for every day in November 2011. Check out the prompt at the bottom of this post to find out how you can participate! Motivation is a funny thing. As personal as it is, each of us needs some kind of carrot to keep moving toward a goal – especially if it’s a challenging one. Travel goals, when they’re not challenging in and of themselves, are often the reward for doing something we’d rather not do (like, umm, working). The right set of words can be the carrot that keeps you pointed in the right direction. Some may stick a photograph of a beach on their bulletin board to remind them of an upcoming vacation, and some may get a clearer mental image from a particular phrase. For today’s 30 Days of Indie Travel prompt, “Quote,” I’m sharing not just some of my favorite travel quotes but also some submitted by other BootsnAll staffers, gathered (loosely) into three categories. I’m a quote-a-holic, so I couldn’t post just one. I hope at least one of these resonates with you – and if not, I hope you’ll share the one that does. Going Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things […]