Benefits and Guidelines

What are the benefits to writing for BootsnAll? Many. What are our editorial rules and policies? Few, simple and common sense. Read on, before you send in:

Pay & Compensation

BootsnAll now has four separate programs for writers, and three of them are paying markets.

1 – Feature Articles – We are interested in submissions for entertainment-oriented feature articles. Ideally, these can appeal to a broad audience rather than just a small group of people researching a destination.
>> more information on the BootsnAll Feature Articles Program

2 – Expert Travel Articles – We are interested in publishing articles that the writer can cover completely. These articles will become part of our travel research sections, and can be focused on one destination, or they can be more general.
>> more information on the BootsnAll Expert Travel Articles Program

4 – Traveler Articles/Guest posts – Our traditional traveler articles program continues to be unpaid, but we accept and publish a broader range of pieces in this way. These articles go out to our Daily Dose newsletter subscribers and are a great way to get your work in front of an audience of your peers. Many experienced writers continue to submit their travel tales over the years, and this is also a great way to get started in travel writing and get your name out there.
>> more information on the BootsnAll Traveler Article/Guest Posts Program

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Official BootsnAll Writing Style

In general, we encourage each writer to let his or her own voice come through in the articles. However, we do have some guidelines to help you craft a better article, whether that be a feature, expert article, or guest post.

Formatting basics

  • We use the down style of capitalization in our subheaders. So: it’s “When to go,” not “When to Go.” Titles are capitalized in title style “10 Reasons to Visit Iceland Now”
  • The current editor believes in the Oxford Comma.  Please use it.  For example:  We went to India, Thailand, and Vietnam on our trip.  Not:  We went to India, Thailand and Vietnam on our trip.
  • Though your tone may be casual and informal, writing an article for BootsnAll is not the same as writing an email or a personal bog post. Watch your use of slang (unless you’re using it in dialogue) and never use all caps or multiple exclamation points for emphasis. If you must use italics or exclamation points for emphasis, use them sparingly.
  • Avoid cliches like “an unforgettable experience,” “there’s nothing better than,” “a dream come true,” “picture-perfect,” “postcard-perfect,” “stunning views.” Saying “There’s nothing better than the unforgettable experience of seeing those picture-perfect stunning views,” tells the reader absolutely nothing. Stretch yourself to describe something in a better way. What makes this an unforgettable experience? Why are the views stunning?
  • Avoid overly used phrases – quaint, charming, rustic, luxurious, awe-inspiring, breath-taking. Again, tell us why – why is this town charming, what makes the cabin rustic, what about this hotel is luxurious?
  • Don’t make assumptions or sweeping generalizations. “Every traveler loves,” or “You can’t visit the island without seeing the.” Not every traveler loves that thing and many people probably do visit without seeing the item you say they can’t miss. Watch your use of “best” as well. What it makes it the best? Unless you can confidently say you know it really is the best, find another way to describe it.
  • If you’re thinking about submitting a travel narratives, craft it in a unique way.  We don’t want stories that simply say, “I went to London. Then I saw Big Ben.  Then we went to a pub.”  Leave out the boring parts. No one wants to hear the play-by-play of everything you did on your trip. Find the central story and concentrate on that.  Focus on inspiring others to travel through your personal stories.
  • Spell check and read through for grammatical errors. While we will make minor fixes, we will reject articles that have too many errors.
  • Be link happy. If there are other sites out there with more information on a particular subject, link to them. Also feel free to add links to specific hotels, attractions, and restaurants that you cover in your article. However, if you are a company looking to place links in a “guest post,” please be aware that we will remove the links or offer you the opportunity for a sponsored post.
  • Pay attention to the length. Features and expert articles generally range from 1200-2000 words. Please keep guest posts to no longer than 2500 words. Generally, articles under 800 words will not be accepted.

Editorial Style & Policy

For starters, we do reserve the right to edit and to make changes to your article. If you submit something but stipulate that we cannot edit or proofread it, then unfortunately we won’t be able to publish your work. For the traveler articles and guest posts, our editorial policies are pretty open, and keep you and your style in mind:

Proofreading, English Language & HTML. For traveler articles/guest posts, BootsnAll’s editors keep the editing light. We check spelling and glance at grammar. We accept British, American, Canadian, Imperial, Australian, Kiwi, and all other various regional, slangish, or international flavors (flavours) and adaptations of the English language. We do edit more thoroughly on paid submissions and reserve the right to make changes at our discretion; however, we will not make major changes that affect the tone or meaning of your writing without your approval.

Major Changes. Every once in a while we might see something that could use a little more work. If we do, we don’t just swoop in and make major changes. Instead we contact you, the writer, with our suggestions for the relevant text. Then we will work together to finalize any changes.

Accuracy, Libel & Originality. When you submit your work to BootsnAll, we give you as much freedom, leeway, and latitude as possible. We know you know your stuff, but at the same time, we have to state that when you submit your article, you also are agreeing to and stating that each of the following is true:

  1. The article is accurate, to the best of your ability.
  2. The article is not libelous, and does not contain libel.
  3. The article is original; that is, the article is your own writing, not someone else’s, and the article and no part of the article does not infringe on someone’s copyright.
  4. You retain sufficient rights and copyright to submit the article, and that BootsnAll has permission to edit and publish it.
  5. BootsnAll is not responsible or liable for any errors in your submission or for any problems, inconveniences, etc. that might arise with anyone from such errors.

Should BootsnAll be notified of any problems with your article as regards the above, we will get in touch with you to help get everything resolved. To break it down, our site provides an audience for your work, and in return we ask that what you write is accurate, does not contain libel, and that the writing is your own. Besides, why bother submitting it otherwise? Now, speaking of an audience…
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Community & Feedback

  1. Exposure. Being published on BootsnAll puts your work in front of people who truly care about what you write: thousands of information-hungry travelers, fueling their brains for future trips, filling up on info on a favorite or particular place, or just stuffing themselves with a good read that gives ‘em a hard shudder, a hearty laugh, or just a slightly more expanded perspective.
  2. Feedback. Your story’s publication is good for our members and readers, and obviously it’s good for you, the writer, as well. They get to read good writing, you get your good writing in front of them, and they are all too happy to give you their feedback. Our community is vocal and interactive; writers often hear from readers, who email with questions, request further info, or comment on the story, their own experiences, or travel itself. Publishing on BootsnAll means your reach extends beyond your story, directly into our entire community, and creates dialogue between writer and reader.  We want you to embrace this communication and make meaningful connections with our readers.  If this is not something that interests you or you find it a hassle, then you probably aren’t the right fit for BootsnAll.
  3. Email & Privacy. We do require that writers supply a valid email address so we can track you down if need be (and tell you when your story will be published, too!). If you would prefer not to use your primary email address, no worries: feel free to set up an account that you use only for your BootsnAll work. By the way, if you’re worried about privacy, BootsnAll’s own privacy policy is pretty simple: we do not sell, share or distribute your contact information. Period.
  4. Experience. There’s more to it than just the feedback, of course. You’re a writer – but everyone is a writer (and a critic!). But now you can say that you’re a writer – with a track record. Gumshoes and veterans alike write for BootsnAll. It keeps your pen moving, your skills honed (especially when writing travel guides); it’s a lot of fun, plus it builds your portfolio. The experience you gain also extends to the relationships you build and interactions you have with BootsnAll. We try to give feedback and encouragement to each writer, and to deal with every writer on an individual basis. If you need help, feel free to ask us; the same goes true for a laugh or some motivation. The interaction makes the job fun for us, and hopefully for you too, so email us so we can start talking to you about writing for BootsnAll’s vibrant travel community.

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Writing FAQ

  1. Do I have to be a professional writer to submit to BootsnAll?
  2. Do any professional writers submit to BootsnAll?
  3. I don’t write for free. Why should I consider a non-paying market like BootsnAll?
  4. Have any of your authors been ‘discovered’ on BootsnAll?
  5. Do you ever reject stories?
  6. Do you hire writers? Do you have any job openings?
  7. Can I submit images with my story? How many?
  8. Do I need to use my full name?
  9. Why do I need a valid email address?
  10. Who does your fact checking?
  11. What writing/editing style do you follow?
  12. Who edits my story?
  13. Will I get an assessment of my piece from the editor?
  14. When will my story be published?
  15. Can I remove my article in the future?
  16. I see an error in my article after it’s published. How do I get it fixed?
  17. Can I submit article revisions?
  18. I want assignment editors to be able to contact me. How can they do that?
  19. Can I write a bio for your site?
  20. I see my article on another site and I didn’t submit it there. Did you publish it elsewhere?

  1. Do I have to be a professional writer to submit to BootsnAll?
    Absolutely not! Our writers come from, live, and travel all over the world. They are people of all ages, of all walks of life. Some are very serious about being professional travel writers; some use BootsnAll as a way to build a portfolio as they try to break in to the writing biz. Some people just want to talk about travel, to share their experiences and what they’ve learned with others.
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  2. Are any professional writers a part of the BootsnAll community?
    Yes, quite a few, including Rolf Potts, Jen Leo, Karen van der Zee, Erik Olsen and Ayun Halliday. There are also a number of other industry lurkers including journalists, editors, publicists, writers, and bloggers.
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  3. I don’t write for free. Why should I consider a non-paying market like BootsnAll
    Simply put, because Google loves us. Go ahead, type in Africa Travel Stories or France Travel Stories or even just plain ‘ol travel stories. You’ll see that a BootsnAll site is always the first thing listed. That means any editor searching for Africa, France, or many other destination-based travel stories will find your writing at the top of the list. And, as you’ll see in question 4, that can mean $$ for you. Publishing something on your own website doesn’t do you any good if no one sees it.  We also have close to 40,000 newsletter subscribers spread out over our various newsletters, so your content will get in front of thousangs of readers.
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  4. Have any of your authors been ‘discovered’ on BootsnAll?
    Yep! Check out the stylings of Philip Blazdell, Leif Pettersen, Erik R. Trinidad and Dave Copeland, among many others.
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  5. Do you ever reject stories?
    Unfortunately, yes. Stories that are too short, full of spelling and grammatical errors, well over the word limit, poorly put together or clearly advertising copy for a resort or service are rejected as guest posts. Well-written, informative features are also rejected because the subject matter just isn’t right for our paid program.  Make sure that anything you submit for BootsnAll follows the tenets of the Indie Travel Manifesto, and you’ll have a much better chance of being published on BootsnAll.
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  6. Do you hire writers? Do you have any job openings?
    We are not currently hiring full time or part time writers for our staff.  The majority of our articles come freelancers.  We do like working with the same writers, though. Our in-house writing is done by our staff.
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  7. Can I submit images with my story? How many?
    Every article requires photos.  In fact, the photos are just as important as the article itself, so make sure you have or can get quality photos for your article before submitting the pitch.
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  8. Do I need to use my full name?
    We ask that you do use a first and last name for your articles. You can choose a psydonym if you would like, however, please use real names.
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  9. Why do I need a valid email address?
    We promise not to sell, distribute, or spam your email address, however, we do need one in order to publish your writing. We must be able to contact you in case of any questions or issues that arise from your story. You can also review our privacy policy.
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  10. Who does your fact checking?
    You do. So please research the correct spelling of names, dates, and locations.
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  11. What writing/editing style do you follow?
    We follow a modified version of AP Style.
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  12. Who edits my story?
    Adam Seper is currently the features and traveler articles editor at BootsnAll.
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  13. Will I get an assessment of my piece from the editor?
    Due to the high volume of submissions, we are unable to provide analysis of all articles submitted to BootsnAll. However, our community often comments on published pieces and provides feedback.
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  14. When will my story be published?
    For guest posts, we try to publish your story within three-four weeks of receiving it. You should get an automated email the morning your story publishes.  You can also see if your story has been published by searching the site for your author name and checking out our article page for your story.  For paid submissions, we try to stay about 6-8 weeks ahead, so if you submit a pitch that we like, your article may not be published for a couple months.
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  15. Can I remove my article in the future?
    No, you cannot. By submitting your article, you are agreeing to let us publish it for an indeterminate period of time.
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  16. I see an error in my article after it’s published. How do I get it fixed?
    Email us and let us know what needs to be corrected.
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  17. Can I submit article revisions?
    Due to the time spent editing articles, revisions may not been sent once it is already edited. Please revise your article before submitting it for publication.
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  18. I want assignment editors to be able to contact me. How can they do that?
    The easiest way for people to reach you is to include a link to your site or blog in your bio (for guest posts only).
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  19. Can I write a bio for your site?
    Yes.  We love having author bios.  Keep in mind that if you write a paid article, we cannot include a link to your website or blog.  But we can include that in your author bio, which we can link to from any paid article that is published. It’s great to have a face and personality behind the story. Just include your bio on your guest post submission.  Here is an example of an author bio.
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  20. I see my article on another site and I didn’t submit it there. Did you publish it elsewhere?
    Chances are, probably not. We have had problems with other sites republishing our content without permission in the past. If you spot this, please let us know.
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So whatcha think? (Or does use of the non-word “whatcha” set your narrative teeth to grinding?) If you’d like to submit stories to BootsnAll for publication, great. Just use the links below to get the rest of the skinny on scribbling for BootsnAll, for its various sections, and how to submit your own stories and images. (You can also use the links on the

top-left side of this page to go to whatever section you want to read next.)