Category Archives: 2012 Indie Travel Challenge

In 2012, BootsnAll challenged our readers to write a blog post every week based on a prompt of our choice. Even if you missed out on the live version, if you’re just getting started blogging, you can find some great ideas on topics to write about.

The Closing Post of the Indie Travel Challenge 2012

Just over 1 year ago, we ran the #indie30 blogging and sharing month on BootsnAll. We all had so much fun, that we decided to try a weekly Indie Travel Challenge for 2012.

When we started the ITC in January, we intended to do it for the whole year. But with 2012 coming to a close soon, and the year anniversary of #indie30, I decided to end it with this blog post.

We had a lot of fun with the folks that participated and we are impressed with the folks that stuck with it. It was a challenge for us to run it as well for the whole year! Coming up with ideas, getting them out there, and managing the real entries as well as inevitable spam that can with the mini-site that we built for the ITC.

I think that the month long version was more fun, and easier to mentally handle than the year-long idea. It was an ambitious idea and we gave it a good shot. We will probably do a shorter version again in 2013.

To wrap it up, I’m going to link to an assortment of participants. Thank-you for playing and sharing!

Our Oyster

Eat Drink Travel Repeat

Erin R. Caughey

Destination Unknown

Hannah and the World

NithinCoca.com

AntSaint.com

YQ Travelling

I’m a Wanderer

Going Nomadic

Different Doors

Sunshine and Stilettos

World Flavor

Head in Knots

Wide-Angle Wandering

Heathers Harmony

The Opinionated Waderlust

The Journey is the Reward

Wanderlusty

A Sense of Place

A re-discovered life

Pierced Hearts & True Love

A la tierra que fueres haz lo que vieres

Ashventures

Outside Context

Kokopelli Camping

Reflections Enroute

160K

Edgy June Cleaver

Couple of Travels


Passport and a Toothbrush

Fluent in Frolicking

The World of Deej

Katieonthemap.com

Trail Licious

The Write Brain

It Depends

The Wandering Cook

Heather’s Harmony

Everything is Transitory

Grounded Traveler

Two and a half travelers

Celebrating Themeless Discontinuity

Muffled Solitude

The Edventure Project

Have Fun…Will Travel

Leaps and Bounds to Everywhere

Gallivanting Greg

Miss Coco Marie

Nicholasdecorte.be

Crooked Priorities

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We challenge you to learn a new language

Being a polyglot goes beyond improving your career or getting a nice job. Even the cultural extend of it doesn’t even scratch the surface when it comes to benefits. And while it may be impressive to be in a polyglot in the Anglophone world, this is quite a normal thing in many cultures.

Being a polyglot is a mental exercise, allowing you to be more aware and comfortable in using your own language , helping you express easily. Speaking multiple languages opens the possibility to exercise and use your brain capacity even further. When you learn the new words, the brain makes connections, growing further as you create phrases and learn the syntax. Each step means a lot of intellectual growth. Learning a new language also boosts your thinking and conversational skills. You’ll soon realize that you can browse your vocabulary easier.

And let’s not forget the cultural part. Speaking a new language allows you to experience a culture independently not as it is “supposed” to be experienced. It’s a totally different experience to spend time in a new country and speaking the language than to go only on the beaten path with a guided tour and speak only English (or French, or German).

Do you speak two languages or more? What are those? This week we challenge you to start learning a new language, regardless of how many languages you already speak.

Currently I am happy to say that I am native in one language (Romanian) and speak another fluently (English), but I also understand three more (French – thanks to classes in school- , Italian and Spanish – thanks to the TV I used to watch when I was a kid). I am also actively working on improving my Hungarian (which I started to learn as a child but somehow lost interest along the years) and Greek skills. Ideally, by winter I hope to be fluent in Hungarian and by next summer I wish to handle Greek at conversational level. I take on the challenge to work on my Hungarian skills now and I will report on my progress.

I must say I was impressed by an Armenian guy I met in the hostel we stayed in Athens. He was fluent in English and Greek, spoke pretty good Romanian, Spanish, Italy and Hungarian… I asked him how many languages he can speak and I think he stopped at seven.

» This week on BootsnAll: Articles you’ll read this week include: an interesting piece on planning to live abroad, the indie travel guide to the Yukon Territory, lovely information on things one of the writers learned from life and travel, info on the top 6 destinations in Latin America right now and a piece featuring 10 more fascinating cemeteries.

Week 43 of the Indie Travel Challenge is all about language.

This week we challenge you to start learning a new language.

Don’t forget to add your blog posts to the main Indie Travel Challenge page – and be sure to include a picture when you do (we love pictures!).

The Indie Travel Challenge is a year-long blogging project. Every Monday, we’ll post a new prompt, question, or challenge that bloggers can respond to via text, photos, or video. Respond on your own blog, and link back to BootsnAll so we can find and highlight the best submissions.

Check out the Indie Travel Challenge landing page for all information related to the event. You can see the week’s daily prompt, follow the hashtag on Twitter, share your posts, and check out submissions from around the world.

Read more about language:

Photo by jovike

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What is on Your Travel Playlist?

Ask any traveler what their must-pack list includes and an mp3 player or Ipod is always on the list. That’s because music is an excellent way to boost the mood, to find comfort in the familiar and to keep us relaxed while traveling. Road trips and long flights, bus or train rides are incredibly boring without music. And although we often prefer to read while traveling, we don’t always have the brain power to do that.

What is on your travel play list? Which song is your favorite?

Ever since my cell supported music – and later when I got an mp3 player – I’ve always had a playlist ready to save the day. Between 14 to 18 hours train rides and often reading an entire book along the way, good music has always kept me company. I tend to listen to rock music most of the time – Guns’n’Roses, Meat Loaf, Tina Turner, Whitesnake – but often I find myself listening to empowering songs, too, such as “I’m a Woman” (sang by the cast of Sex and the City) and “I Will Survive”. My favorite song is also from the Sex and the City 2 soundtrack: Alicia Keys , “Empire State of Mind (Part II) Broken Down”.

» This week on BootsnAll: Articles you’ll read this week include: a transformational story featuring volunteering in rural India, details about what to do in Alaska, info on why creating an NGO gives back to the local economy, useful tips for touring China by rail and a piece on 12 of the most fascinating cemeteries in the world.

Week 42 of the Indie Travel Challenge is all about music.

What is on your travel play list? Which song is your favorite?

Don’t forget to add your blog posts to the main Indie Travel Challenge page – and be sure to include a picture when you do (we love pictures!).

The Indie Travel Challenge is a year-long blogging project. Every Monday, we’ll post a new prompt, question, or challenge that bloggers can respond to via text, photos, or video. Respond on your own blog, and link back to BootsnAll so we can find and highlight the best submissions.

Check out the Indie Travel Challenge landing page for all information related to the event. You can see the week’s daily prompt, follow the hashtag on Twitter, share your posts, and check out submissions from around the world.

Read more about music and traveling:

Photo by Thomas Hawk

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Have You Taken a Career Break ?

We already know that a career break can change your life but it wasn’t until recently that they have become popular in countries such as the United States. Ten years ago, a career break would have been considered a career suicide. And nowadays with the still uncertain economy, many assume that people should be happy with the job they have and not risk losing it.

Even if you fancy such an experience there are a lot of logical reasons not to do so. It’s scary to think that you leave a somewhat stable situation behind and choose the unknown. And what about when you get back home? How would you get another job?

That’s why people are looking for inspiration and examples of those who have already chosen to take a career break. They haven’t just left everything behind, many went on self-discovery journeys , whether they planned it or not. In many cases, the feeling that something was “missing” sparked the idea of traveling the world and taking a career break.

Did you take a gap year or have you taken a career break?

At one point in my life I was not happy with where my professional life would take me and decide to go back to a hobby: writing. I was un-employed and searching for freelancing gigs, which happily arrived in my inbox sooner than I expected. While I haven’t planned a career break, the Universe made it clear for me back in 2007 that I needed to take a break and I did. It was sprinkled with a trip to Budapest, followed by finding (or maybe being found by) BootsnAll. Writing as I travel is something I enjoy a lot, that’s why I probably would never just leave everything behind , but I certainly plan to travel for a longer period of time next year (and most likely limit my work to just writing).

» This week on BootsnAll: Articles you’ll read this week include: a lovely transformation story about a couple who decided not to live a simple life anymore and travel the world, reasons why you shouldn’t just pass through Bangkok but, instead, take your time to explore the city, info on the mistakes to avoid on your round the world trip and info on eight great travel books that will make you hit the road.

Week 41 of the Indie Travel Challenge is all about career break.

Did you take a gap year or have you taken a career break?

Don’t forget to add your blog posts to the main Indie Travel Challenge page – and be sure to include a picture when you do (we love pictures!).

The Indie Travel Challenge is a year-long blogging project. Every Monday, we’ll post a new prompt, question, or challenge that bloggers can respond to via text, photos, or video. Respond on your own blog, and link back to BootsnAll so we can find and highlight the best submissions.

Check out the Indie Travel Challenge landing page for all information related to the event. You can see the week’s daily prompt, follow the hashtag on Twitter, share your posts, and check out submissions from around the world.

Read more about career breaks:


Photo by Cristina Puscas and may not be used without permission.

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Shoulder Season Travel

Shoulder season refers to those wedges between the high and low season , when the weather is good, the crowds have left or haven’t arrived yet and the potential for deals is high. Spring and autumn are both considered shoulder season and both having pretty much the same advantages. Shoulder season means the tourist demand is low and you get a lot more for your money.

If you want to experience good weather, travel closer to the high season. Since both spring and autumn are rainy, always have a back-up plan just in case you’ll have to make friends with the umbrella or have to stick to indoor activities. When traveling during shoulder season, make sure to pack layers.

Do you like to travel during the shoulder season? Which is your favorite destination for this time of the year?

While I’ve done my fair share of traveling during festivals and summer, I certainly prefer to pack my bags and head out during spring or fall. In March 2011 I managed to find excellent prices for accommodation in London, while this year, I was able to score €65 euro RT flights per person from Rome to Athens. Having also traveled in mid to late October, I can certainly say that from the photo opportunities I prefer autumn. Any destination which offers lovely fall foliage can be on my list for this time of the year. Otherwise, I choose the shoulder season to visit expensive locations (London, Rome, or Paris).

» This week on BootsnAll: Articles you’ll read this week include: a lovely take on how a career break can lead to a path you’ve never expected, a piece on why a gap year – a career break – is a good idea and why it’s needed in America, too, info on what the hardest part of planning for long travel is, more details about career breaks and five reasons to take a career break.

Week 40 of the Indie Travel Challenge is all about shoulder season travel.

Do you like to travel during the shoulder season? Which is your favorite destination for this time of the year?

Don’t forget to add your blog posts to the main Indie Travel Challenge page – and be sure to include a picture when you do (we love pictures!).

The Indie Travel Challenge is a year-long blogging project. Every Monday, we’ll post a new prompt, question, or challenge that bloggers can respond to via text, photos, or video. Respond on your own blog, and link back to BootsnAll so we can find and highlight the best submissions.

Check out the Indie Travel Challenge landing page for all information related to the event. You can see the week’s daily prompt, follow the hashtag on Twitter, share your posts, and check out submissions from around the world.

Read more about shoulder season travel:

Photo: Autumn in Greece

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